Livin’ La Vida Local: Downtown Grand Rapids

Live like a Local and kick start a great day by visiting the Downtown Market on a Sunday. Sunday’s at the Downtown Market offer cooking classes, food pairing courses, family entertainment and games for kids from 4-7 PM. The Downtown Market is home to many Local First members such as Fish Lads, Love’s Ice Cream, Malamiah Juice Bar, and Tacos el Cunado to name a few. Enjoy strolling Jazz provided by Triumph Music Academy every Sunday as you explore the market.

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Take the kids to the Grand Rapids Art Museum and celebrate the 50th anniversary of Maurice Sendak’s book “Where the Wild Things Are” the exhibition has original prints, interactive opportunities for the family, and wild things everywhere you look. The exhibition is available for visitors through May 22. The GRAM also offers free General Admission all day on Tuesdays and Thursday evenings from 5-9PM.

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6.25 Paper Studio has cards for every occasion and stationary of all styles. 6.25 Paper Studio is a dream for the organized as it has products to support your business or lifestyle as well as crafting workshops held throughout the year. The US and Michigan made products are sure to make you laugh, smile, or gasp during your shopping experience.

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Rockwell Republic offers locals two environments to choose from for nightlife. There is a casual side to unwind after a full day of exploring Downtown Grand Rapids or venture over to the more modern environment for a date night. Treating yourself to a nightcap at Rockwell Republic is a great local way to end a fun day!

Hope Farms Connects Refugees to Agricultural Roots

Hope Farms, a project of Bethany Christian Services’ Refugee Programs, connects skilled refugees with land and education for small-scale farming in West Michigan. Those involved last year season participated in food preservation classes, and savored their hard-earned harvest for months after the growing season. “Our farmers are still pulling last seasons’ green beans out of the freezer,” Farm Manager, Scott Townley reports.

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The six farmers participating in Hope Farms this year are men and women from Burundi and Nepal. A recent NPR story, featuring a similar program in Kansas City, points out that farming can have a big economic impact for refugees striving to make ends meet. Farming also helps refugee growers connect to their roots. “When I’m out on the farm, I feel like I’m back in my country,” Kharka Gurung, a Hope Farms participant from Bhutan, says through an interpreter.

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Hope Farms will offer a CSA, and sell produce at farmers’ markets in westside and southside neighborhoods. These venues connect refugee growers to West Michigan’s local food system, and generate supplemental income. Hope Farms facilitates much more than commerce. “Our farmers work incredibly hard to support their families,” Townley says. “They can help us re-envision what it means to be entrepreneurial.”

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Working closely with Hope Farms growers, all of whom have been in West Michigan for fewer than five years, Townley found participants valued control over their pocketbooks and kitchen tables. Rachel Jameson, an AmeriCorps VISTA working with the program, says “The word ‘subsistence’ usually gets a bad rap. This season, we’re trying to redeem the term.” As a result, the program will focus on innovative practices for high yields on small plots.

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Growing food helps save a lot of money. “I will keep some of what I grow for my family, sell some, and donate some to the Bhutanese-Nepali community,” Gurung says. He looks forward to growing hot peppers, mustard greens, cucumbers, spinach, buckwheat and bitter gourd. “I’m thankful for the help of Scott to engage with the farm, to learn English, and for the exercise of being outside.”

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“Here, food is expensive,” says Frida Mutoniwabo. Having fled persecution, she found a way to farm in a refugee camp years ago. This season, she looks forward to growing eggplant, squash greens, and other crops from her native Burundi. Mutoniwabo also wants to learn to grow lettuce, onion and kale. “Most importantly, I want take my kids to the field, so they can know where food comes from. I want them to say, ‘Mom, that’s how a tomato grows?’”

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“I consider myself a pretty skilled farmer,” Townley says, “but all of our farmers this year know so much more than I do. It’s a deep skill for them.” Past Hope Farms participants have managed 25 – 30 acres in their home countries, feeding their families while earning extra cash. “This generational knowledge has sustained communities. We’re helping our farmers transplant it here.”

Announcing the 2016 Street Party performers!

Whether you like electronic, folk, hip hop, blues or indie, the Local First Street Party has you covered. This year's lineup highlights a varied spectrum of Michigan's talented musicians. Performances include headliner Joshua Davis, a Traverse City native who placed third on The Voice in 2015. Street Party veterans the Crane Wives will return with indie folk harmonies and Tunde Olaniran will turn up the beat with his unique electronic R&B vibe. Triumph Music Acadmey will kick things off and indie folk artist Chris Bathgate, feel good hip hop from Lady Ace Boogie, and Mark Lavengood's Blue Grass Bonanza will keep the tunes coming all afternoon. 

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Audacious Hoops and 61Syx Teknique Street Dance Academy will return this year to entertain the crowd between music sets. The 13th annual Street Party will begin at 3 p.m. and run until midnight outside Bistro Bella Vita, 44 Grandville Ave. SW #100. The free, all-ages event showcases interactive dancing, sidewalk chalk and recycled art. Local food truck vendors and Founders beer will be available.

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Entertainment lineup:

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Joshua Davis (folk/rock/blues) 
nCrane Wives (Americana/folk)
nTunde Olaniran (electronic/pop/R&B)
nChris Bathgate (indie/folk)
nLady Ace Boogie (feel good hip hop)
nMark Lavengood's Blue Grass Bonanza (roots /bluegrass)
nTriumph Music Academy (student performance)
n61Syx Teknique Street Dance Academy (youth breakdancing troupe)
nAudacious Hoops (Interactive hula hooping)

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Special thanks to our sponsors:

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Parsley

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Parsley offers wonderful flavor, rich color, and outstanding nutritional value. Parsley provides more vitamin A than carrots and more vitamin C than oranges and is high in minerals, particularly iron.

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How to Prepare:

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After washing, chop parsley leaves either finely or coarsely depending on the dish you are making. The stalks have a lot of flavor and can also be chopped finely and added to any dish.

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How to Store:

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For short term storage, wrap parsley in a damp towel or place upright in a container with an inch of water and refrigerate. For longer term storage, parsley can be dried.

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How to Cook:

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You can use parsley as a green in stir-fries, just add it toward the very end of cooking to retain color, flavor, and nutrition. You can think of parsley as a green and toss it into a salad or chop it into just about any chilled pasta or vegetable salad. You can also use it fresh or dried in a homemade tomato sauce or in soups or stews.

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Information adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini

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Recipes

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Parsley Gnocchi with Goat's Curd and Hazelnuts

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Ingredients

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  • 2-¼ lb potatoes, scrubbed
  • 1 large bunch flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1-½ cup flour
  • ¼ cup butter
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 1 cup butter
  • 4 banana shallots, finely diced
  • ½ cup hazelnuts, chopped
  • Fresh goat's curd or goat's cheese, to taste
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Preparation

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Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Put the potatoes on a baking tray and bake in the oven for 1 hour, or until cooked through. Blanch the parsley in boiling water, refresh and blitz to a puree. Remove the potatoes from the oven. When cool enough, cut them in half and scoop the flesh into a bowl. Keeping the potato covered with a tea towel so it doesn't dry out and go hard, gradually pass it through a coarse sieve, potato ricer or a mouli into a large bowl.

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Add the egg, pureed parsley, flour, butter, salt and pepper to the sieved potato and mix into a soft dough. Be careful not to overwork the dough, as it will go gluey and tough. Bring a large saucepan of lightly salted water to a rapid boil. Roll the dough on a lightly floured surface into sausage shapes roughly 1 inch wide, then cut into 1 inch pieces and lay on a floured plate. Add half the gnocchi to the saucepan of boiling water, cook for 5 minutes, then drain. Repeat with the remaining gnocchi. When you are ready to eat, heat up a large frying pan and add the butter and shallots. Fry until translucent then add the hazelnuts.

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Continue to fry for a few minutes until the butter is foaming, then add the gnocchi. Cook for 8-10 minutes until browning, puffy and warmed through. Season well and spoon into a bowl, then dot with goat's curd. Get the guests to stir in the goat's curd when ready to eat and tuck in.

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Recipe courtesy of The Guardian

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Almond and Parsley Salsa Verde

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Ingredients

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  • ⅔ cup roasted, salted almonds, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 cup olive oil
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Preparation

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Combine chopped almonds and parsley on a cutting board; chop together again until very finely chopped. Transfer almond mixture to a bowl and add garlic. Stir olive oil into almond mixture until a thick sauce forms.

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Recipe courtesy of All Recipes

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Fava Leaf and Parsley Quiche

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Ingredients

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  • 1-½ cups whole-wheat flour
  • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ¾ cup cold unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1-½ teaspoons minced garlic
  • 6 ounces fava or spinach leaves
  • ⅓ cup chopped green onions
  • 1 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1-¾ cups milk
  • 1-¾ cups heavy cream
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
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Preparation

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Make crust: Whirl 1-½ cups flour and the salt in a food processor to blend. Add butter; pulse until mixture looks like cornmeal. Add ¼ cup ice water; pulse again until dough comes together, 30 seconds. Press dough into a disk, wrap in plastic wrap, and chill at least 1 hour and up to 1 day. Unwrap dough and let warm up 15 minutes. With a floured rolling pin, roll into a 12-inches. round. Press round onto bottom and up sides of a 10-in. deep-dish pie pan.

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Fold under the crust overhang on pan rim; crimp edge. Chill 30 minutes. Put oven rack on lowest rung. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Line crust with parchment paper and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake crust 25 minutes; remove weights and parchment and bake until crust is slightly browned, about 10 minutes more. Remove crust from oven and set on a rimmed baking sheet. Raise oven temperature to 375 degrees. Make filling: In a large frying pan, heat oil over medium heat.

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Add garlic, fava leaves, green onions, parsley, and salt and cook, stirring often, until leaves are wilted, about 4 minutes. Chop mixture coarsely, then arrange over bottom of warm crust. Make custard: Heat milk and cream in a large heavy-bottomed saucepan over high heat until mixture begins to simmer. Remove from heat. Put eggs in a blender with half of hot milk mixture and whirl for a few seconds. Whirl in salt and remaining milk mixture.

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Pour custard into crust, being careful to keep greens evenly distributed. Bake quiche until slightly browned around edges and beginning to puff in center, 25 minutes. Let cool until warm or room temperature before serving.

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Recipe courtesy of My Recipes

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Charmoula

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Ingredients

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  • 1-½ cups chopped cilantro
  • 1-1⁄2 cups chopped parsley
  • 2 tbsp. toasted and ground cumin seeds
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • ¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil
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Preparation

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Pulse cilantro, parsley, cumin seeds, garlic, salt, and pepper in a food processor until combined; transfer to a bowl and stir in olive oil.

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Recipe courtesy of Saveur

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Quinoa and Parsley Salad

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Ingredients

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  • 1 cup water
  • ½ cup uncooked quinoa
  • ¾ cup fresh parsley leaves
  • ½ cup thinly sliced celery
  • ½ cup thinly sliced green onions
  • ½ cup finely chopped dried apricots
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ cup unsalted pumpkinseed kernels, toasted
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Preparation

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Bring water and quinoa to a boil in a medium saucepan. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until liquid is absorbed. Spoon into a bowl; fluff with a fork. Add parsley, celery, onions, and apricots. Whisk lemon juice, olive oil, honey, salt, and black pepper. Add to quinoa mixture, and toss well. Top with seeds.

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Recipe courtesy of My Recipes

Cooking a Frozen CSA Share from Save the Season

Eating locally in winter can prove to be quite a challenging endeavor. Although we are fortunate in West Michigan to have access to local meats, cheeses, breads, and root vegetables throughout the cold winter months, if we neglected to spend time drying, canning, and freezing our produce during summer, we are out of luck as far as fruits and most vegetables are concerned.

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In order to fill this gap, Genevieve Miskell created Save the Season, a frozen CSA program that provides our community with an alternative to industrially-produced food throughout the winter. Becoming a CSA member with Save the Season ensures localvores enjoy locally-grown produce all year round. November through March, their members receive high quality, small-batch dehydrated and frozen fruits and vegetables to be enjoyed when fresh local produce is not available. Save the Season is strongly committed to growing the West Michigan local food movement and they work directly with small, family farms to process and preserve their produce and provide them with an additional source of income. They only work with farms using sustainable practices, ensuring that their customers are getting the most nutritious products and our environment is being protected. Some of the farms that Save the Season purchases from include Earthkeeper FarmGreen Wagon FarmReal Food FarmMitchell's Blueberries, and Urban Roots.

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As a member of Save the Season, I have been lucky enough to enjoy local fare all year round and experiment with frozen foods. In order to share my experience with a frozen CSA share with you, I chronicled how I cooked and enjoyed one month's share below. 

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For reference, the full frozen CSA share included shredded potatoes, blueberries, kale, green beans, tomatoes, dried tomatoes, dried purple basil, and garlic scape hummus.

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Roasted Vegetables

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Ingredients

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  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 3 potatoes
  • 2 turnips
  • 2 cups of carrots
  • 2 cups of green beans
  • 1 can of tomatoes
  • ¼ cup shredded cheddar cheese (Farm Country Cheese)
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Preparation

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Heat olive oil in a medium to large sauce pan. Once oil is hot, add garlic, onions, potatoes, and turnips to the pan and cook over medium heat for about 15 minutes. Next add carrots and cook for 5 more minutes. Then add green beans and tomatoes and cook for 10 more minutes. Once vegetables are soft, take pan off of heat and let cool for a few minutes. Sprinkle cheese on top and enjoy.

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Blueberry Cherry Smoothie

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Ingredients

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  • 1 cup frozen kale
  • 1 cup frozen cherries
  • 1 cup frozen blueberries
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbps peanut butter
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Preparation

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Simply put all ingredients together into a blender and blend until smooth.

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Pumpkin Walnut Cookies

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Ingredients

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  • ½ cup butter, room temperature
  • 1-½ cups brown sugar, packed
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup mashed or canned pumpkin
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2-½ cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1-½ cups chopped walnuts or pecans
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
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Preparation

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Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In a large mixing bowl, beat butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time; stir in pumpkin and vanilla extract. In a separate bowl, combine flour, baking powder and spices; stir to blend.

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Add dry ingredients to butter and sugar mixture; stir well. Stir in chopped nuts. Drop by rounded teaspoonfuls about 1-inch apart onto greased baking sheets. Bake in upper half of oven for about 12 to 14 minutes. Remove to a wire racks to cool.

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Recipe courtesy of Southern Food

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Garlic Scape Pesto Pizza

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Ingredients

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Preparation

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Heat oven to 400 degrees. Spread garlic scape pesto onto pizza crust. Sprinkle dried basil, dried tomatoes, shredded cheese onto crust. Once overn is heated, bake the pizza for 10 minutes or until the crust is browning. Enjoy!

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Warm Greens Salad

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Ingredients

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Salad

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  • ½ cup cider vinegar
  • ⅓ cup brown rice syrup or maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • 2 medium onions
  • ½ pound baked, seasoned tofu, cut into ½ inch cubes
  • ¼ cup toasted sesame seed oil
  • 1 pound kale, stalks removed, cut into thin ribbons
  • 3 cups loosely packed mesclun mix or other salad greens
  • 3 medium tomatoes, coarsely diced
  • 1 medium cucumber, sliced into half rounds
  • ¼ cup pistachio pieces
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Dressing

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  • ¼ cup cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon
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nWhisk together the vinegar, brown rice syrup and curry powder in a small bowl. Place the onions in a medium bowl. Add the vinegar mixture and toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate 20 minutes. Heat the sesame oil in a large saucepan over a medium-high flame. Add the tofu and cook until slightly crisp, turning to brown all the sides. Remove the tofu to paper towels to drain. Transfer the onions and half of the marinade to a large skillet.

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Simmer until the liquid is reduced to a thick syrup and the onions are translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the kale to the skillet and saute until limp, 1-2 minutes. In a large serving bowl, toss together the mesclun greens with the kale, onions and 2-3 tablespoons of any liquid remaining in the skillet. Add the tofu, tomatoes and cucumbers and toss again. Top the salad with pistachio pieces and croutons. For the dressing, whisk together all ingredients. Drizzle sparingly over the salad.

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Recipe courtesy of Venturesome Vegan Cooking

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Crispy, Crunchy, Golden Shredded Hash Browns

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Ingredients

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  • 1 pound russet potatoes, peeled
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
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Preparation

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Shred the potatoes on the largest holes of a box grater. Wrap in a kitchen towel or several layers of cheesecloth, and twist to squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Transfer the potatoes to a plate lined with two layers of paper towels. Cook in a microwave on high for 2 minutes. Heat oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. When oil shimmers, add shredded potato. Season with a large pinch of salt and pepper.

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Using a spatula, press potato into an even layer. Cook until golden brown on the bottom, about 2 minutes. Flip the potatoes with the spatula and brown on the other side, about 2 minutes longer. Remove and drain on a paper-towel-lined plate. Serve immediately.

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Recipes courtesy of Serious Eats

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Interested in buying a frozen CSA for next season? Sign up with Save the Season today!

Cilantro

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Cilantro is a pungent herb with a unique flavor. People respond to cilantro with either delight or disdain. Cilantro is used in a variety of ethnic cookery, particularly Mexican, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, and Indian. Coriander, the seed of the cilantro plant, is a core ingredient in the Indian curry tradition.  

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How to Prepare:

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Wash cilantro by submerging it in water and washing for a minute. Dry cilantro with a dish towel or a salad spinner. Remove the larger stems and then chop the leaves and the remaining stems together with a sharp knife.

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How to Store:

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For short-term storage, wrap cilantro in a damp towel or stand upright in a container with an inch of water, and refrigerate. Do not wash prior to refrigeration. Freeze fresh leaves in a plastic zip-lock bag. Remove air, seal, and freeze. Do not thaw before use. Cilantro is one of the few herbs that does not retain its flavor when dehydrated.  

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How to Cook:

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Add fresh leaves to soups, stews, and stir-fries for an aromatic touch. Add cilantro toward the end of cooking time to retain fresh flavor and color. Toss fresh leaves into a green salad. Chop into pasta and potato salads. Use cilantro in ethnic cooking, such as Thai, Indian, Mexican, and Chinese.

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Information adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini

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Recipes

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Carrot Almond Salad

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Ingredients

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  • extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup / 3 oz sliced almonds
  • a small handful cilantro, about ½ cup
  • 1 medium clove garlic, peeled
  • ½ jalapeno pepper, seeded and de-veined
  • ¼ teaspoon fine grain sea salt
  • ⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 bunch / 8 oz baby carrots, scrubbed and sliced in half lengthwise
  • 1 bunch / 16 oz pencil-thin asparagus, stalks trimmed, cut into 2-inch segments
  • squeeze of lemon, optional
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Preparation

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Bring a large pot of water to a boil. In the meantime, toast the almonds in a large skillet over medium heat in a splash of olive oil along with a big pinch of salt. Let them get deeply golden, remove from heat, and set aside. Make the dressing by combining the cilantro, garlic, jalapeno, and salt in a food processor – or alternately, in a blender or with a hand blender. Drizzle the olive oil in while pulsing, continuing until the dressing is a creamy, vibrant green. Taste, and adjust to your liking with more salt, garlic, jalapeno, etc.

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Salt the boiling water generously, then add the carrots, wait 15 seconds and add the asparagus. Depending on the actual thickness of your carrots/asparagus, cook for about 30 – 60 more seconds, you want the vegetables to retain some structure and bite. Drain and immediately run under cold water to stop the cooking. Spin dry in a salad spinner. In a large bowl toss the vegetables with a generous splash of the dressing. Toss well, add 2/3 of the toasted almonds and gently toss again. Taste and adjust for seasoning. You might want to add a quick squeeze of lemon juice at this point, but it's optional. Serve family-style topped with the remaining almonds.

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Recipe courtesy of 101 Cookbooks

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Grilled Acorn Squash with Cilantro Mojo

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Ingredients

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  • 1 acorn squash, peeled, halved and seeded
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 small garlic clove, minced
  • ¾ cup chopped cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • A pinch of sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
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Preparation

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Cut the squash, crosswise, into slices and then brush with 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Sprinkle with a few pinches of sea salt and freshly ground black pepper and then place on a grill pan for 10 minutes to cook, turning occasionally to ensure even cooking.

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Place the garlic in a bowl, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and then mash into a paste. Add the cilantro, lime juice and the remaining 6 tablespoons of olive oil and stir well until blended. Add a few pinches of salt and pepper to taste and then spoon the sauce over the squash. Serve immediately.

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Recipe courtesy of She Knows

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Green Curry Porridge

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Ingredients

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  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemongrass, minced
  • 3 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1-¾ cups uncooked brown rice
  • 5 cups water
  • 4 teaspoons fine grain sea salt
  • 1 14-ounce can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger, peeled
  • 1 small serrano chile, seeded
  • 1 cup cilantro, plus more for serving
  • ½ cup green onion tops (reserve the bottoms for serving)
  • 1 cup sorrel (or 1 cup spinach + 2 T. lime juice)
  • 1 small delicata squash, halved, deseeded, cut into ¼-inch thick crescents
  • For serving: chopped green onions, chopped cilantro, lime wedges, olive oil
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Preparation

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To a large pot over medium heat, add the olive oil, lemongrass, garlic, coriander, and rice. Stir constantly until the rice kernels are toasted and fragrant, 7-10 minutes. Add the water, slowly and while stirring–the heat will cause the water to bubble. Stir in 2 teaspoons of the salt and let the soup simmer gently, stirring occasionally, for about 25 minutes or until the rice has cooked through and many of its grains have burst. In the meantime, combine the coconut milk, ginger, serrano chile, cilantro, green onion tops, sorrel, and remaining 2 teaspoons of salt in a blender. (Alternatively, you can use an immersion blender here.)

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Blend until smooth, then taste and adjust, if needed. Add the herbed coconut milk, along with the squash, to the porridge. Simmer for an additional 10-15 minutes, or until the squash is tender. Taste for seasoning and adjust to your liking. To serve, ladle the porridge into bowls and top each with chopped green onion, a small heap of chopped cilantro, a drizzle of olive oil, and a wedge of lime.

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Recipe courtesy of 101 Cookbooks

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Southwestern Spiced Sweet Potato Fries

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Ingredients

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  • 2 large sweet potatoes, cut in large matchsticks, approximately ¼ inch wide x 2 inches long
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon chile powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne, or to taste
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons sweet chili sauce
  • 1 small garlic clove, minced
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 heaping tablespoon chopped cilantro
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Preparation

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Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Toss sweet potatoes and olive oil in a large bowl. Combine salt, cumin, chile powder, paprika, pepper and cayenne in a small bowl. Add spices to potatoes and toss to coat. Arrange potatoes in one layer on baking sheet. Bake in oven on lowest rack until undersides are browned, 12-15 minutes. Turn potatoes with a spatula and bake 10 more minutes. Remove from oven and serve with Chili-Cilantro Sour Cream. 

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For Chili-Cilantro Sour Cream: Combine all the ingredients except the cilantro in a medium bowl and whisk together. Stir in cilantro.

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Recipe courtesy of Food 52

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Cilantro & Ginger Hummus

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Ingredients

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  • 1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas
  • ½ cup tahini
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • ¼ cup cilantro
  • juice from ½ a lemon
  • ¼ cup water
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
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Preparation

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In a food processor blend chickpeas until they are a coarse grain. Add tahini, garlic, ginger, lemon juice, cilantro and salt. Blend for a minute or two. Now with the processor still running, drizzle in the oil and then the water. For an even smoother, thinner consistency, add more water. Eat on naan, crackers, veggies, or spread on a sandwich.

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Recipe courtesy of A Beautiful Mess